Friday, April 15, 2011

Edmund Dulac













Born in Toulouse, France in 1882, Edmund Dulac studied law until he became bored and switched to art. He moved to Paris to continue his studies at the Académie Julian. In 1906 he settled in London where he enjoyed a fruitful association with the Leceister Gallery which would commission paintings from him and then sell the rights to Hodder & Stoughton who would publish the books while the gallery would sell the paintings. Dulac produced many books under this arrangement, including: The Arabian Nights (1907)...




Shakespeare's, The Tempest (1908)...






The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam (1909)...







The Entomologist's Dream (1909)...


The Sleeping Beauty and Other Fairy Tales from the Old French (1910)...





...including, Cinderella...






...and Beauty and the Beast...







Stories from Hans Christian Andersen (1911), including The Nightingale...



The Snow Queen...




And of course, the tragic and unforgettable, The Little Mermaid...






Then there is, The Garden of Paradise (1911)...



The Wind's Tale (1911)...




The Bells and Other Poems by Edgar Allan Poe (1912)...

"The Bells"

"Annabel Lee"


"To The River"

"Fairyland"

"Lenore"

Princess Badoura (1913)...






The Dreamer of Dreams (1915)...




Stealer's of Light (1916)...



And finally, Edmund Dulac's own Fairy Book (1916), which would be one of his last illustrated books.




But this would certainly not be the end of Dulac's career. After WWI, Dulac spent the majority of his time working as a portrait painter, costume designer, set designer, newspaper caricature artist, and designer of government and commercial goods such as bookplates, chocolate boxes, medals, banknotes, and even postage stamps to commemorate British royalty.






Edmund Dulac's talent is overwhelming! He had such a fruitful career that touched nearly every aspect of art and design, but none of his works will be so endearingly remembered as his charming fairy tale illustrations. Their magical depictions will continue to enliven our wildest dreams and fancies, and forever make glad the heart of childhood.

~S

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